Resources - Resuscitation

Key Stage 3

Brown teddy bearFor this activity, you will
need the biggest teddy bear that you own. You should not practise this activity on other people as you could bruise their chest and cause them pain.

Place your teddy bear on the floor as if they were unresponsive and not breathing. Approach the teddy bear as the first aider and decide what to do to practice your resuscitation skills. If you are unsure of what to do, refer back to the video,
but you should cover the following points.

  • Call to the teddy bear and shake the teddy bear shoulders to check for a response.
  • Place one hand on the forehead and two fingers under the chin of the teddy bear to tip the head back slightly.
  • Watch to see if there is breathing. Is the chest moving? Does the face look pale? Is there blue around the mouth and nose?
  • Remember at this point we would be calling for an ambulance.
  • Start to compress the chest, by placing both hands in the centre of the chest and compressing the chest 100-120 times a minute to a depth of about 1/3 of the teddy bear.
You may want to show the video clip of how to do resuscitation to a family member and give them this list of things you must do. Ask them to watch you and check you do not miss anything.

Key Stage 2

For this activity, you will need an appropriate size teddy bear or doll. We will refer to teddy or doll as a toy from now on.

You must not practice this activity on each other.

Place the toy on the floor and tell your child that their toy is unwell and needs their help. Ask the child to go to check on their toy and provide them with the following information as they check the toy.

  1. The toy is not responding to them when they call to them or shake the toys shoulders.
  2. The toy does have an airway when the head tipped back slightly.
  3. The toy is not breathing when they watch for breathing. The toy is very pale, with blue lips and around the nose.
  4. When they call for emergency services, ask them the following questions.
    • What emergency service would they like?
    • What is their location?
    • Is their toy responding?
    • Is their toy breathing?
    • Inform your child the ambulance service is on the way.
    • Once your child has been carrying out compression for a while, offer to take over from them as if you are the ambulance arriving. Alternatively, tell them the ambulance has arrived and they will now help the toy.
    • After you have done some compression, tell your child they did a great job and have saved their toy.
When you carry out this exercise you are looking for the following things to happen as seen in the video.
  • They call to the toy and shake the toys shoulder to check for a response.
  • They place one hand on the forehead and two fingers under the chin to tip the head back slightly.
  • They watch to see if there is breathing. Is the chest moving? Does the face look pale? Is there blue around the mouth and nose?
  • Do they call for an ambulance?
  • They start to compress the chest, by placing both hands in the centre of the chest and compressing the chest 100-120 times a minute, with squashing toy flat to the floor.
If the child is using a doll which is too small to press with one hand, get them to press with two fingers, which what we would do for a baby. Explain to your child that on an adult we would use both hands, but as the toy is small we will
practise with two fingers.

Key Stage 1

You can use a toy phone with this activity.

If there are more than two of you in the house, have one of you lie on the floor for this exercise. Alternatively use a doll and link the discussion to what would happen if your child found you on the floor not responding and not breathing.

Once a family member or doll is lying on the floor, carry out the following:

  • Ask your child to check if you are responding by calling to you or gently shaking your shoulders.
  • When the unresponsive person does not respond, ask your child if they are breathing. At this point, the person on the floor briefly holds their breath while the child decides.
  • Discuss with your child the difference between sleeping and not breathing. Ensure they understand that ambulance is only needed for not breathing.
  • When your child says not breathing, ask them what help they need. Discuss with them about finding an adult and if they cannot find an adult to call the emergency services.
  • Have a discussion with your child about what to tell the ambulance, including where they are and the person is not breathing. They can do this while talking into the toy phone.